low-flow toilet

Benefits of Low-Flow Toilets

low-flow toiletLow-flow toilets are a great way to reduce the amount of wastewater that ends up in a septic system. If you live in an area that relies on private septic systems, as opposed to a municipal sewer system, it is important to do everything you can to reduce water usage to prevent expensive damage to the septic system.

Septic systems are typically used in locations that aren’t connected to the city sewage system.   A septic tank is a large tank, usually made out of concrete, that holds waste materials that are flushed through the residential sewage system. Inside the tank, bacteria works to break down the solid wastes, which are then released via wastewater into a drainage system.

Because low-flow toilets reduce water usage, they are ideal for cutting down on the amount of water that enters septic  systems. Low-flow toilets are also used by homeowners that do not have a residential sewage system, as a means of reducing overall water consumption.

How Low-Flow Toilets Work
Low-flow toilets are designed to use less water than a standard toilet. The average residential toilet uses three to four gallons per flush, while low-flow toilets use around one-and-a-half gallons per flush. Recently, newer low-flow toilets have been produced that use even less water per flush by using a dual-flush system.

Much like septic tank systems, homeowners need to be aware of what gets flushed down low-flow toilets. The only thing that should ever be flushed down low-flow toilets that are connected to a septic tank system is toilet paper and organic waste. That means absolutely no paper towels, feminine products, diapers, newspapers or other paper materials.

The chemicals used to clean low-flow toilets that are hooked up to a residential septic system must also be chosen carefully. Bleach, abrasives, anti-bacterial cleansers and other bathroom cleaners should never be flushed into septic tank systems or washed down the drain. Use natural cleaners, such as baking soda or vinegar, to protect the good bacteria inside the septic tank that works to breakdown solid waste.

Part of a Healthy Septic Tank System
All of the parts of your residential septic system work together to effectively and efficiently process all the waste from your home. Low-flow toilets can be an important part of a well-run septic system. The best way to care for your system is to hire a professional septic system maintenance and inspection service.

A low-flow toilet is very easy to maintain and helps to reduce water usage in the bathroom. The fixture that helps to reduce water usage inside low-flow toilets may need to be adjusted every now and again. This fixture is the fill valve. It is used to maintain a proper level of water inside the toilet tank.

Septic Preservation Services offers a preventative maintenance program, which can be used to keep tabs on the effectiveness of your system, catch potential problems before they get out of control and keep your residential sewage system running properly. Learning about your system and how it should be used and cared for, is another important part of good home ownership. Proper care and preventative maintenance, when used together, can prevent costly repairs and replacements.  Call Septic Preservation Services at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

State of the Art Equipment Used for Septic Inspections

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services has septic inspection appointments today in Kennebunk, Kennebunk Port, Wells, North Berwick, Cape Neddick, Lebanon, Alfred, ME and Rochester, NH.  We can provide video inspections which are very thorough and are conducted using state of the art color sewer camera equipment.  Not only do we inspect the septic system, we also educate you about the proper care and use of the system.  We will check the following conditions:

 

  • Condition of septic tank
  • Effluent level in tank
  • Need for pumping
  • Condition of tank baffles
  • Condition of effluent lift pump (non-gravity systems)
  • Condition of effluent pump chamber
  • Condition of pipe from tank to field
  • Condition of the distribution box
  • Soil clogging in drainfield
  • Tree or plant root intrusion
  • Accumulation of solids in leach field

 

If you require a septic inspection or if you have any questions about septic inspections please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Overboard Discharge Service by Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services is the only statewide contractor on the Wastewater Treatment Plants Certified Maintenance Contractors list provided by the Maine Department of Environmental Protection.  This means that we are the only contractor statewide that can service mechanical OBDs.  As stated on the Maine Department of Environmental Protection website:

 

“An overboard discharge (OBD) is a discharge to surface waters of the State of domestic pollutants (sanitary wastes or wastewater from household activities generated at residential or commercial locations) that are not conveyed to municipal or quasi-municipal sewerage treatment facilities.  The vast majority of OBDs in Maine are associated with residential dwellings and small commercial operations along the coast.”

 

For more information see:

 

http://www.maine.gov/dep/water/wd/OBD/ip_obd.pdf

 

We have overboard discharge service and overboard discharge repair appointments today in Freeport, Harpswell, Brunswick, Orr’s Island, Bailey Island, Phippsburg, Peak’s Island, and Portland, ME.  If you need to arrange an OBD service or an OBD repair please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Elizabeth Alves

Meet Elizabeth Alves of Septic Preservation Services

Elizabeth AlvesMeet Elizabeth Alves of Septic Preservation Services.  Liz started working at Septic Preservation Services in April of 2015.  She has been a member of the team for 2 years and is Division Manager of the All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services Division of SPS.  She is Title 5 licensed and is certified to perform inspections in Massachusetts and Rhode Island.  Her favorite part of her job is working with customers and helping them solve their septic issues.  Liz is fluent in Portuguese and this is extremely helpful with Portuguese speaking clients.  She is also a notary republic.

Personally, Liz resides in Attleboro with her husband and three children.  She is active in a  Portuguese Heritage Group in Stoughton and performs at Portuguese Carnival Dances where she sings and plays the guitar.  She really enjoys this in her leisure time and is also involved in an All Girl dancing and singing group in East Providence.

Liz started at SPS as a novice but has really enjoyed learning the ins and outs of the septic business to better help her clients.  Liz recalls jumping right into the training during her first days on the job.  She was excited to volunteer for the hands-on learning activities but was a little surprised when she came across her first activity with a odorous septic tank.  She was a little taken back by the smell but continued on, determined to complete the task.

You can reach Liz and all the rest of the team at Septic Preservation Services at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Safety Meeting at Septic Preservation Services

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services considers Safety to be a top priority. This includes the safety of its technicians, office staff, and customers . To ensure that our technicians are safe in their work, we have monthly safety meetings with our field technicians.  Today’s meeting will cover the OSHA training that our technicians have been taking, job site evaluations that have taken place, review of our revised Lock Out/ Tag Out (LOTO) procedure and Personnel Protective Equipment training.  We have staff attending this meeting from Cranston, Rhode Island,  Attleboro, Norton, Sharon, and Easton, MA, and Biddeford, Maine.  Please call us with all your septic inquiries at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Septic Repairs on Short Notice

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services has septic repairs scheduled for customers in Pittston, Gardiner, Whitefield, Alna, Windsor, Richmond, Palmero, and Winthrop, Maine.  We are able to attend to our clients septic repairs on short notice from our Maine office.  Once we have assessed the condition of your septic system, we will present you with a range of options designed to correct any identified issues.  These may include one or more of the following:

 

  • Replacement of damaged or missing baffle
  • Installation of effluent filter and service riser
  • Installation of pumping access riser and cover
  • Installation of curtain drains
  • Replacement of deteriorated components
  • Repair or replacement of damaged components including septic pump repair
  • Removal of accumulated solids in leach field piping
  • Removal of plant and tree roots in leach field piping
  • Installation and service of the White Knight™ Microbial Inoculator/Generator
  • Diversion of water softener/conditioner backwash discharges
  • Detailed explanation of our Septic Use Guidelines

If you need a septic repair, have any questions about your septic system or have concerns that your system is not operating correctly please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Condominium Septic Inspections

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services have septic inspections scheduled today in Attleboro, North Attleboro, Plainville, Wrentham, Bellingham, Foxboro, and Franklin, MA.  The majority of septic inspections that our licensed inspectors carry out are for property owners who are selling their homes, but we also do septic inspections for people who are buying a home with a septic system. Today, we also have an inspection at a condominium complex that is not being sold.  This is because condominiums with five or more units must be inspected once every three years.  Those with four or fewer units must be inspected every three years, or within two years prior to the sale of one of the units.  If you require a septic inspection, or if you have any questions about septic inspections please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Al Rivet

Meet Al Rivet of All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services

Al RivetMeet Al Rivet of All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services.  Al plays many roles in the All Clear Septic and Septic Preservation Services Team.  He is the founder of All Clear Septic and Wastewater Services started in 2004.  He is a Title 5 educator, a member of the teaching team for Functional Inspections at University of Rhode Island, and  an integral part of realtor relations, and educating realtors on Title 5 issues.

Personally, Al is a lifelong resident of the Southcoast area.  He has a graduate degree from Salve Regina University and is a US Army Veteran as well as 25 years in law enforcement.   He has been married for 48 years to Elizabeth Rivet and is a father to nine children and a grandfather to 30.

His favorite part of his job is working with people and  his ability to help people with important septic issues.

Outside of work, Al enjoys spending time with his wife and children and grandchildren.  He likes spending time at the beach, walking, biking, and kayaking.

One of the memorable stories from his septic experience is a family in a fairly new, two-year old home.  The family consisted of a couple with two children.  The septic system had failed in a short amount of time.  Why?  The culprit was antibacterial soap.  The Dad was a doctor and used a large amount of antibacterial soap in the home and the Mom flushed a good deal of hair coloring chemicals down the drain.  Both contributed to the failure.

A funny story he remembers:

“Several years ago, Beth, one of my eight daughters was working with me digging up a septic tank for a title 5 inspection. This was her lucky summer of high school working with Dad.  I was digging up the d-box while she was digging up the tank.  She opened the cover to the tank and me, with my back to her, heard a noise.  She was gagging at the odor emanating from the tank.  We both had quite a laugh about that. She toughed it out and continued working on the other cover!  Many laughs over the years reminiscing about that odorous summer. ”

Al is pleased to be an integral part of the team.  Stay tuned to meet more members of the Septic Preservation team.

Visit www.septicpreservation.com or call 877-378-4279  to talk to Al or the other septic professionals.

Septic Preservation Services

Overboard Discharge Services and Repairs in Maine

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services has Overboard Discharge Services and Repairs scheduled today in Harpswell, Freeport, Brunswick, Pownal, Lisbon Falls, Bowdoinham, Peak’s Island, and Portland, ME.  For more information regarding OBDs see:

 

https://www1.maine.gov/dep/water/wd/OBD/ip_obd.pdf

 

These are a few general tips that will help to extend the life of your OBD and promote high quality effluent.  

 

  • Some household chemicals kill the microorganisms that digest the wastes in your treatment system and may pass through to the receiving waterbody.  Toxic chemicals, harsh cleaners, paint, pharmaceuticals, and non-biodegradable materials should not be disposed of by dumping or pouring down the drain.    
  • Using low-flow toilets and water-saving showerheads will prolong the life of your system.
  • Septic tanks should be pumped at least once every three years.  Depending on how much the OBD facility is used, you may want to increase the septic pumping frequency or decrease it to once every five years if it receives very little use.    
  • Trees, shrubs and woody perennials should be cleared away from system components.  Sandfilter surfaces should be mowed at least once per year.  If a wet spot appears on or near the sandfilter bed notify the DEP inspector.    
  • Mechanical systems operate best if they are used at a consistent rate and may malfunction or produce poor quality effluent if overloaded on the weekend and “starved” during the week.  Try to manage laundry, cleaning, and showers so that the load is spread out as evenly as possible.  Leave a mechanical OBD operating as recommended by your service contractor at all times during the season of use.  
  • Check the chlorine level at least every two weeks and keep fresh chlorine in contact with the treated wastewater.  Don’t overfill the chlorinator tubes; only the bottom two or three inches of the tubes should have chlorine.  Old, brown or mushy chlorine does not properly disinfect and must be replaced.  Take care to remove old chlorine from your chlorinator rather than washing it out to the waterbody.    
  • Ensure that the outfall pipe extends to below the low water mark of the receiving waterbody.  In extenuating circumstances a specific waiver to this requirement may be granted by the Department.    
  • Treated wastewater should be clear and without a strong septic or chlorine odor.  If wastewater in the disinfection unit is not nearly clear, smells like rotten eggs, raw sewage, or smells strongly of chlorine, call your service contractor or notify the DEP inspector.

If you require an Overboard Discharge Service or repair you will need to contact a certified maintenance contractor. Septic Preservation Services is the only Statewide contractor on the Maine Department of Environmental Protection Wastewater Treatment Plants certified maintenance contractors list.  If you wish to make an appointment or if you have any questions please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com

Septic Preservation Services

Signs You May Need Septic Pumping

Septic Preservation Services Septic Preservation Services has septic pumping scheduled for customers in Hudson, Acton, Wayland, Stow, Maynard, Southborough, and Clinton, MA. Signs that your septic system may need a pump out are, your toilets backing up when there is no apparent reason for it, and sewage smells coming from your plumbing.  If there is overflow by your tank this is also a sign your system needs maintenance.  Some systems even have an alarm which could be a noise or a light to indicate that it is time for septic pumping.  All of these can be signs that a pump out could be necessary and it is  always worth investigating, because you may have a problem or need septic pumping.  Most homeowners with septic systems are aware that their system needs septic cleaning every 3 -5 years, but this can vary depending on various factors including the size of your tank and the water usage.  Please be aware of the signs that your system needs pumping, and if you have any questions, concerns, or need to schedule septic pumping, please do contact our office at 877-378-4279 or visit www.septicpreservation.com